Has your child been affected by neuroblastoma? Call 020 7284 0800 for help and information.

Trustees of Solving Kids’ Cancer

The Board of Trustees at Solving Kids’ Cancer is responsible for providing governance and leadership. They work for the charity voluntarily to make sure we’re doing all we can to support children affected by neuroblastoma, and their families.

If you are interested in becoming a Trustee of Solving Kids’ Cancer, then please contact our Chief Executive, Steve Richards, for an informal discussion on stephen.richards@solvingkidscancer.org.uk. We are especially interested in meeting candidates with the following expertise:

  • Treasury & Financial Management
  • Governance, Legal & Compliance
  • Network & Corporate Relations
  • Human Resources & Operations
  • Communications & Marketing
  • Fundraising

Click through to view the Trustee Board Terms of Reference and Role Description and Person Specification.

Thank you so much for your interest in the work of Solving Kids’ Cancer.


Joey Tabone, Chairman

Joey Tabone, ChairmanJoey is a Director at Business in the Community, The Prince of Wales’s Responsible Business Network, where his work helps to create a fairer society and a more sustainable future. Joey joined The Prince’s charities in 2007. Prior to this he worked for the Australian Government’s Department of Climate Change where he managed Australia’s largest carbon reduction programme. His charitable interests in Australia include 7 years as President of The AIDS Council of the Australian Capital Territory where he helped identify support for people living with HIV and AIDS.

Joey joined the Board of Trustees in 2015, bringing with him his experience working within the UK charitable sector and leading a health-related charity in Australia. His initial interest was to support building governance structures to help reinforce the charity’s capabilities. Joey became Chairman of the Board in November 2016.

Joey holds other non-executive roles in the UK including Trustee of The Environmental Law Foundation and Patron of The Sir John Soane Museum in London.

“My personal motivation to help Solving Kids’ Cancer is twofold, firstly to learn more about cancer treatment and care, having lost family members to cancer-related diseases and secondly to demonstrate the important contribution to society that a user-led charity makes. In my professional life, I believe I have gained more experience and empathy in working alongside and within charities and firmly believe that charities and the people that work within them, make an invaluable contribution to society and at their heart, are a force for good.”

Nick Bird, Research & Advocacy, Treasurer (Interim)

Nick Bird, Research & Advocacy, TreasurerNick first became involved in the charity in 2009 when his youngest son, Adam, was diagnosed with high-risk neuroblastoma. After Adam showed little response to standard frontline therapy, Nick and his family travelled with him to both Germany and America for treatment. Whilst seeking options for Adam, Nick became more involved in research, attending symposiums and meetings. Following Adam’s death in 2013, Nick continued to engage in activities relating to research and advocacy on behalf of other children with neuroblastoma. In 2016 he became a member of the National Cancer Research Institute Children’s Cancer & Leukaemia Clinical Studies Group (NCRI CCL CSG), as well as a member of the specialist sub-group for neuroblastoma. Nick joined the Board of Trustees in April 2016, and is committed to trying to improve the outlook for children in the UK diagnosed with cancer, and neuroblastoma in particular. Outside of his voluntary life he works for a technology company in the financial services sector, and lives in Epsom with his wife and their two other children. In his spare time he enjoys swimming, cycling, and running, and has completed a number of marathons … with several more to come, he says.

“Neuroblastoma claims the lives of infants and young children, just starting out in life. Whilst there are brilliant doctors and researchers trying to find new ways to beat this disease, at present the most effective weapons continue to be the old artillery of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. And despite the most intensive treatment regime for any cancer, over half the children diagnosed with high-risk neuroblastoma still go on to die, whilst the majority of those who survive are left with serious, life-long, side-effects. Researchers need our help; to engage with them, challenge them, steer them, support them, push them, and provide the funding commitments that make research happen, that in turn makes change happen. We must speak up for the children with this terrible disease, for they are simply too young to have a voice of their own.”

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Solving Kids' Cancer

Tel: 020 7284 0800

CAN Mezzanine
49-51 East Road
London
N1 6AH

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